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International Teaching Predictions for 2012 #7: Latin America

#7: International Schools in Latin America

“Again, flickers in some parts of Latin America. I find that growth in international schools often follows a construction boom, and Brazil in particular is in the midst of a construction boom.  That being said, there are many more factors that affect international schools growth including ministry regulations, attitudes towards education and public policy so it’s uncertain at the moment.  Last year growth in Latin America was pretty stagnant and it will take a mighty engine to turn this around especially since much of Latin America’s economy is tethered to the US which is facing presidential elections next year so it’s unlikely that we will see much real growth next year, even if it all moves in the right direction.”

Taken from the “Teach the World with Teachanywhere” blog written by General Manager by Diane Jacoutot.




Medellin, Colombia

Currently (as of 21 May, 2012), on www.internationalschoolcommunity.com, we have 109 international schools listed in the South America (79) and Central American (30) regions of the world.  That makes South American rank #7 (out of 13) and Central America rank #12 (out of 13) in terms of the regions of the world with the highest number of international schools listed on our website.  The expat communities there seem to be growing and thus the need for more international schools is also growing, especially in countries like Brazil. But it is also important to note that there are a fair amount of older, more established schools in these regions as well (see statistics below that were found on our website).

Out of the 21 countries that we have listed in the South American and Central American regions, the top five countries with the highest number of international schools listed on International School Community are the following:
1. Brazil (17 schools listed)
2. Colombia (15 schools listed)
3. Venezuela (10 schools listed)
4. Costa Rica (9 schools listed)
5. Honduras (8 schools listed)

Some more facts about these international schools in South America and Central America listed on our website:
• 70 teach the American Curriculum, 18 teach the U.K. curriculum and 1 teaches the IPC curriculum.
• 13 are less than 15 years old, 42 are between 16 and 50 years old and 54 are more than 51 years old.
• 30 are For-profit schools and 79 are Non-profit schools.

The following schools in India have had comments and information submitted on them:
Lincoln School (San Jose) (8 Comments)
American School of El Salvador (10 Comments)
Alison Bixby Stone School (7 Comments)
Escuela International de Sampedrana (17 Comments)
International School Panama (8 Comments)
St Andrew’s Scots School (10 Comments)
Highlands International School (11 Comments)
Santa Cruz Cooperative School (24 Comments)
American School of Brasilia (13 Comments)
School of the Nations (11 Comments)
Chapel School (Escola Maria Imaculada) (12 Comments)
Colegio Anglo Colombiano (8 Comments)
Colegio Karl C. Parrish (17 Comments)
The British School Quito (13 Comments)

There are many more!  Check out the rest of them here.Many of our members currently work at international schools in the South American and Central American regions:
Kevin Hall
(Uruguayan American School in Montevideo)
Chon Arenas
(American School Foundation of Mexico City in Mexico City)
Karen Dabbs
 
(Lincoln School (San Jose) in San Jose)
Angelica Ayres
(St. Nicholas School Sao Paulo in Sao Paolo)
Susan Freeman
(British School Caracas in Caracas)
Silvia Dubuoé
(Pan American International School in Paraguay)
Julie Bowen
(Santiago College in Santiago)
Sarah Kemme
(Graded School Sao Paulo in Sao Paulo)
Enrique Damasio
(Colegio International de Carabobo in Venezuela)

Check out the rest of our members here. If you are interested in working at an international school in the South American and Central American region that one of our members currently works at, feel free to send these members a private message with the questions and concerns you would like first-hand account answers too.

So, we will just have to wait and see then how the “International School Community” in India actually pans out for the year 2012.

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International Teaching Predictions for 2012 #6: India

#6: International Schools in India

“We are seeing a number of interesting developments in India but most international schools receive fees that are so low that they cannot pay western teachers anything near what they are expecting. India is a booming economy but with a decent educational system and a good supply of home grown teachers, only the very top or most motivated international schools can hire you so there will be limited but interesting opportunities. Another space to watch as the year progresses.”

Taken from the “Teach the World with Teachanywhere” blog written by General Manager by Diane Jacoutot.




Agra, India

Currently (as of 8 May, 2012), on www.internationalschoolcommunity.com, we have 42 international schools listed in this region of the world.  That makes India rank #4 (out of 13) in terms of the regions of the world with the highest number of international schools listed on our website.  According to the article and to what we see happening in our community, there are many new international schools being founded each year in both regions.  For example out of the 165 international schools listed in SE Asia, 72 of them are less than 15 years old; that is a little bit less than half. The expat communities there seem to be growing and thus the need for more international schools is also growing, especially in areas like Thailand and Indonesia.

Out of the 177 countries that we have listed on our website, the top six countries with the highest number of international schools listed on International School Community are the following:
1. China (112 schools listed)
2. United Arab Emirates (43 schools listed)
3. India (42 schools listed)
4. Thailand (39 schools listed)
5. United States (37 schools listed)
6. Japan (35 schools listed)

Out of the 15 cities that we have listed for the country of India, the top three cities with the highest number of international schools listed on International School Community are the following:
1. Mumbai (10 schools listed)
2. Bangalore (6 schools listed)
3. Calcutta (4 schools listed)

Some more facts about these international schools in India listed on our website:
• 5 teach the American Curriculum, 20 teach the U.K. curriculum and 1 teach the IPC curriculum.
• 27 are less than 15 years old, 9 are between 16 and 50 years old and 6 are more than 51 years old.
• 27 are For-profit schools and 15 are Non-profit schools.

The following schools in India have had comments and information submitted on them:
École Mondiale World School (7 Comments)
Canadian International School Bangalore (8 Comments)
Stonehill International School (India) (7 Comments)
International School Aamby (6 Comments)
International School of Hyderabad (8 Comments)
Kodaikanal International School (15 Comments)
American School of Bombay (5 Comments)

There are many more!  Check out the rest of them here.A few of our members currently work at international schools in the India region:
Richard Yates
 (Olive Green International School in Ahmedabad)
Priyanka Bhowmik
(Pathways World School in Gurgaon)
Deirdre

 

Check out the rest of our members here. If you are interested in working at an international school in the India region that one of our members currently works at, feel free to send these members a private message with the questions and concerns you would like first-hand account answers too.

So, we will just have to wait and see then how the “International School Community” in India actually pans out for the year 2012.

International Teaching Predictions for 2012 #5: SE Asia

#5: International Schools in SE Asia

“We expect continued growth in Indonesia, Malaysia and even Vietnam as those emerging economies steadily prosper.  Salaries may seem very low in these countries but the cost of living is even lower so teachers who are flexible and open minded may find huge savings potential here along with a fascinating lifestyle.

Malaysia has invested in English / EFL Advisors and we have those jobs available. The pay and benefits packages are not as high as the Middle East but the cost of living is very, very low.   The Malaysia core subject reform has not taken off like the EFL section due to government policy changes so I don’t expect the core subject advisory jobs to materialise in any great number this year.

Based on our school visits, I can say that schools in the Far East and SE Asia tend to be more academically focussed on average, when compared to similar schools in the Middle East, North Africa and even Europe.  High educational attainment is an integral part of many cultures here and it’s reflected in attitudes towards schools, teachers and academics.  The combination of high quality educational focus and high economic growth in this part of the world must be hugely exciting for many teachers.”Taken from the “Teach the World with Teachanywhere” blog written by General Manager by Diane Jacoutot.




Bali Indonesia

Currently (as of 21 April, 2012), on www.internationalschoolcommunity.com, we have 156 international schools listed in this region of the world.  That makes the East Asia region rank #4 (out of 13) in terms of the regions of the world with the highest number of international schools listed on our website.  According to the article and to what we see happening in our community, there are many new international schools being founded each year in both regions.  For example out of the 165 international schools listed in SE Asia, 72 of them are less than 15 years old; that is a little bit less than half. The expat communities there seem to be growing and thus the need for more international schools is also growing, especially in areas like Thailand and Indonesia.

Out of the 11 countries that we have listed in the SE Asia region, the top four countries with the highest number of international schools listed on International School Community are the following:
1. Thailand (39 schools listed)
2. Indonesia (28 schools listed)
3. Malaysia (20 schools listed)
4. Vietnam (17 schools listed)

Some more facts about these SE Asian international schools:
• 42 teach the American Curriculum, 61 teach the U.K. curriculum and 7 teach the IPC curriculum.
• 72 are less than 15 years old, 61 are between 16 and 50 years old and 23 are more than 51 years old.
• 91 are For-profit schools and 65 are Non-profit schools.

The following schools in SE Asia have had comments and information submitted on them:
Hornbill School (Brunei) (6 Comments)
Logos International School (6 Comments)
Northbridge International School (9 Comments)
Garden International School (18 Comments)
International School of Kuala Lumpur (26 Comments)
Nexus International School (18 Comments)
International School of Myanmar (10 Comments)
International School Manila (32 Comments)
Singapore American School (11 Comments)
Bangkok Patana School (14 Comments)
International School Bangkok (16 Comments)
KIS International School (Bangkok) (39 Comments)
Hampton International School (13 Comments)
Concordian International School (15 Comments)
St. Stephen’s International School (Khao Yai) (12 Comments)
International School Saigon Pearl (12 Comments)
Global Jaya International School (11 Comments)
Canggu Community School (10 Comments)

There are many more!  Check out the rest of them here.Many of our members currently work at international schools in the SE Asia region:

Claire Dirk (Cambodia International Academy in Cambodia)
Steven Bentley (Vietnam American International School in Vietnam)
Shantel Seevaratnam (Dalat International School in Malaysia)
Christopher Fadera (Brent School Manila in Philippines)
Dawn Schlecht (International School of Myanmar in Myanmar)
Venkataraman Swaminathan (Bina Bangsa School in Indonesia)
Linda Belonje (KIS International School (Bangkok) in Thailand)
Ceri Thorns (Systems Little House in Vietnam)

There are many more! Check out the rest of them here. If you are interested in working at an international school in the SE Asia region that one of our members currently works at, feel free to send these members a private message with the questions and concerns you would like first-hand account answers too.

So, we will just have to wait and see then how the “International School Community” in SE Asia actually pans out for the year 2012.

International Teaching Predictions for 2012 #4: East Asia

#4: International Schools in East Asia

“It is no coincidence that a number of established British schools groups are uprooting from the UK and relocating their headquarters to Hong Kong. First Nordanglia, and two more big names following next year (not sure it’s been announced so I don’t want to say publicly what I have been told privately).  The Far East and Southeast Asia is an economic bright spot and will remain so for many years to come.  Not only is the international school scene vibrant, especially in China, but a number of state schools -both privately and publicly funded are looking to hire more western expatriates to teach their academic high flyers.  So the appetite, especially in China, for teachers will be voracious in 2012 for teachers.  Teachanywhere are also included in a bid for state schools in Hong Kong, so if that comes through, there may be lots of opportunity there as well.

Based on our school visits, I can say that schools in the Far East and SE Asia tend to be more academically focussed on average, when compared to similar schools in the Middle East, North Africa and even Europe.  High educational attainment is an integral part of many cultures here and it’s reflected in attitudes towards schools, teachers and academics.  The combination of high quality educational focus and high economic growth in this part of the world must be hugely exciting for many teachers.”

Taken from the “Teach the World with Teachanywhere” blog written by General Manager by Diane Jacoutot.




Currently (as of 12 April, 2012), on www.internationalschoolcommunity.com, we have 165 international schools listed in this region of the world.  That makes the East Asia region rank #2 (out of 13) in terms of the regions of the world with the highest number of international schools listed on our website.  According to the article and to what we see happening in our community, there are many new international schools being founded each year in both regions.  For example out of the 165 international schools listed in East Asia, 84 of them are less than 15 years old; that is a little bit over half. The expat communities there seem to be growing and thus the need for more international schools is also growing, especially in areas like China.

Out of the four countries that we have listed in the East Asia region, the top four countries with the highest number of international schools listed on International School Community are the following:
1. China (107)
2. Japan (34)
3. South Korea (21)
4. Mongolia (3)

Some more facts about these East Asian international schools:
• 54 teach the American Curriculum, 35 teach the U.K. curriculum and 3 teach the IPC curriculum.
• 84 are less than 15 years old, 51 are between 16 and 50 years old and 20 are more than 30 years old.
• 88 are For-profit schools and 77 are Non-profit schools.

The following schools in East Asia have had comments and information submitted on them:
Seoul International School (32 Comments)
Dulwich College Seoul (10 Comments)
Seoul Foreign School (12 Comments)
North London Collegiate School (Jeju) (9 Comments)
International School of Ulaanbaatar (10 Comments)
Orchlon School (11 Comments)
American School in Japan (19 Comments)
K. International School Tokyo (10 Comments)
Kyoto International School (9 Comments)
Hiroshima International School (16 Comments)
American International School of Guangzhou (12 Comments)
Western Academy Beijing (30 Comments)
International School of Beijing (15 Comments)
Shanghai Rego International School (72 Comments)
Western International School of Shanghai (27 Comments)
Xi’an Hi-Tech International School (10 Comments)
American International School (Hong Kong) (22 Comments)
Hong Kong Academy Primary School (14 Comments)
Access International Academy (Ningbo) (6 Comments)

There are many more!  Check out the rest of them here.

Many of our members currently work at international schools in the East Asia region:
Paul Grundy (Taipei European School in Taiwan)
Rae Yang (Chinese International School in China)
Mayke van Krevel (Shanghai Rego International School in China)
Kelly Norris (Nishimachi International School in Addis Ababa)
Kiyo Horii (Nishimachi International School in Japan)
Mercy Grace Caliente (International Academy of Beijing in China)

There are many more! Check out the rest of them here. If you are interested in working at an international school in the East Asia region that one of our members currently works at, feel free to send these members a private message with the questions and concerns you would like first-hand account answers too.

So, we will just have to wait and see then how the “International School Community” in East Asia actually pans out for the year 2012.

International Teaching Predictions for 2012 #3: Africa

#3: International Schools in Africa

“With the Egyptian elections over, I predict a huge requirement for teachers in Egypt as the country pulls itself up by its bootstraps and with the help of international investment will try to change the face of the country -starting now. Most Egyptian international schools are attended by Egyptian children and this means we can expect lots of expansion in 2012. We see signs of it already.

Other North African countries such as Sudan and even Libya will see steady development next year.  Libya in particular is a place to watch because the international investment will be massive. It was already on the cusp of some interesting school reform and advisory projects before the revolution and it appears to be picking up the pieces and starting anew albeit cautiously.
For the rest of Africa, oil-rich Nigeria will always be a bright spot internationally but like the Middle East, there are quite a few dodgy schools there which need to be avoided.  There are a good number of truly good and well run international schools and the trick is to know the difference.   Any schools on our books are well known to us based on years of experience but again, other agencies will not have this background and ethos.”

Taken from the “Teach the World with Teachanywhere” blog written by General Manager by Diane Jacoutot.




Currently (as of 1 April, 2012), on www.internationalschoolcommunity.com, we have 146 international schools listed in this region of the world (both Sub-Saharan Africa and North Africa).  That makes the Sub-Saharan Africa region rank #5 (out of 13) in terms of the regions of the world with the highest number of international schools (99) listed on our website; with the North Africa region ranking #10 (out fo 13) with 41 international schools listed.  According to the article and to what we see happening in our community, there are many new international schools being founded each year in both regions.  For example out of the 41 international schools listed in North Africa, 23 of them are less than 15 years old. The expat communities there seem to be growing and thus the need for more international schools is also growing.

Out of the 53 countries that we have listed in the Sub-Saharan Africa and North Africa, the top five countries with the highest number of international schools listed on International School Community are the following:
1. Egypt (25)
2. Nigeria (11)
3. Kenya (9)
4. Tanzania (8)
5. Morocco (8)

Some more facts about these Sub-Saharan Africa and North Africa international schools:
• 56 teach the American Curriculum, 58 teach the U.K. curriculum and 4 teach the IPC curriculum.
• 52 are less than 15 years old, 68 are between 16 and 50 years old and 20 are more than 51 years old.
• 46 are For-profit schools and 94 are Non-profit schools.

The following schools in Sub-Saharan Africa and North Africa have had comments and information submitted on them:
Luanda International school (13 Comments)
International School of Ouagadougou (17 Comments)
American School of Douala (11 Comments)
International Community School Addis Ababa (15 Comments)
Lincoln Community School (12 Comments)
American International School of Conakry (7 Comments)
American School of Antananarivo (9 Comments)
Bishop Mackenzie International School (9 Comments)
American International School Bamako (11 Comments)
The American International School of Nouakchott (9 Comments)
American International School of Mozambique (11 Comments)
American International School Lagos (11 Comments)
Surefoot American International School (9 Comments)
International School of IITA (12 Comments)
International School of Kigali (13 Comments)
International School of Seychelles (18 Comments)
Khartoum International Community School (10 Comments)
The School of St. Jude (11 Comments)
Harare International School (8 Comments)
New Cairo British International School (10 Comments)
Cairo British School (30 Comments)
Cairo English School (17 Comments)
Casablanca American School (11 Comments)
American School of Tangier (10 Comments)

There are many more!  Check out the rest of them here.

Many of our members currently work at international schools in the Sub-Saharan Africa and North Africa:
Claire Gaul (American Cooperative School of Tunis in Tunis)
Megan Graff (The School of St. Jude in Arusha)
Tasha Fletcher (Egyptian British International School in Cairo)
Shehz Carrim (Sandford (British) International School in Addis Ababa)

There are many more! Check out the rest of them here. If you are interested in working at an international school in the Sub-Saharan Africa and North Africa regions that one of our members currently works at, feel free to send these members a private message with the questions and concerns you would like first-hand account answers too.

So, we will just have to wait and see then how the “International School Community” in Sub-Saharan Africa and North Africa actually pans out for the year 2012.

International Teaching Predictions for 2012 #2: Middle East

#2: International Schools in Middle East

“The Arab Spring caused much uncertainty in the beginning of 2011 and it now feels like a distant memory in many ways. International schools in this region continue to grow and thrive, and state school reform projects in Abu Dhabi are continuing on but in a different way (more on this at the end). The Licensed Teacher programme in Abu Dhabi added new grades and has now expanded to include western Head Teachers to step into principal and vice principal roles. We expect this to continue strongly into next year and beyond. Very exciting!

International schools in the UAE and Qatar in particular have never stopped hiring, and most feel cautiously optimistic enough to start expansion plans in 2012 and 2013. Because of the Arab spring, many teachers in the Middle East (especially UAE) decided to stay put last year so I expect a good amount of movement and when combined with natural growth it means lots of opportunities.  Qatar in particular is one to watch as the Qataris continue to invest their considerable wealth into infrastructure and technology projects.  This will continue to be a bright spot for the Middle East in the next few years which is one of the reasons the whole team visited it last month.

The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is also looking to hire a number of teachers in both state schools, private state schools and international schools.  Salaries are usually quite high in KSA and the cost of living is low, so the savings potential here is huge. For many teachers it is considered more of a hardship post, but for others it’s a down-payment on a house.  It should be noted that South Africans are highly sought in KSA – there is an educational affinity  here- opening up lots of options for degree educated South Africans who want to earn a large amount of money in a relatively small amount of time. After many years of schools saying ‘no thanks’ to South Africans, it’s nice to see this.

Now in the Middle East there is such a range of schools  from really top notch schools to schools that we flatly refuse to work with,  and it’s understandable how teachers can get confused.  How can you tell? Certainly not by the school website.  It’s amazing what you can discover with a school visit and feedback from teachers already placed. I would recommend that teachers interested in this region work closely with their consultant and understand both A. What schools will consider you based on your CV and personal situation and B. What you can expect at schools that will consider you.”

Taken from the “Teach the World with Teachanywhere” blog written by General Manager by Diane Jacoutot.




Currently (as of 18 March, 2012), on www.internationalschoolcommunity.com, we have 146 international schools listed in this region of the world.  That makes this region rank #5 in terms of the regions of the world with the highest number of international schools listed on our website.  According to the article and to what we see happening in our community, there are many new international schools being founded each year in the Middle East.  The expat communities there seem to be growing and thus the need for more international schools is also growing.

Out of the 14 countries that we have listed in the Middle East, the top four countries with the highest number of international schools listed on International School Community are the following:
1. United Arab Emirates (39)
2. Qatar (20)
3. Kuwait (19)
4. Saudi Arabia (14)

Some more facts about these Middle Eastern international schools:
• 53 teach the American Curriculum, 45 teach the U.K. curriculum and 7 teach the IPC curriculum.
• 67 are less than 15 years old, 63 are between 16 and 50 years old and 16 are more than 51 years old.
• 76 are For-profit schools and 70 are Non-profit schools.

The following schools have had comments and information submitted on them:
Bahrain Bayan School (12 Comments)
Al Hekma International School (9 Comments)
Naseem International School (Bahrain) (19 Comments)
Ihsan Dogramaci Bilkent Erbil College (14 Comments)
Amman Baccalaureate School (8 Comments)
Dubai International Academy (10 Comments)

American International School of Kuwait (20 Comments)

American Bilingual School (14 Comments)
American International School of Muscat (13 Comments)
Al Batinah International School (9 Comments)
Awsaj Institute of Education (11 Comments)
Dhahran Ahliyya Schools (14 Comments)
American Community School at Beirut (16 Comments)

There are many more!  Check out the rest of them here.

Many of our members currently work at international schools in the Middle East:
Falustein Shoman (Al Ittihad National Private School in Abu Dhabi)
Adam Barash (American International School of Jeddah in Jeddah)
Jane Evans (The International Academy (Amman) in Amman)
Craig Delery (Universal American School in Dubai)
Krista Wolfe (International School of Elite Education in Egypt)

There are many more! Check out the rest of them here. If you are interested in working at an international school in the Middle East that one of our members currently works at, feel free to send these members a private message with the questions and concerns you would like first-hand account answers too.

So, we will just have to wait and see then how the “International School Community” in the Middle East actually pans out for the year 2012.

International Teaching Predictions for 2012 #1: Western Europe

#1: International Schools in Western Europe

“Europe has been very slow this year in terms of growth of international schools and I expect this to continue.  I predict that barring any further economic disasters in Euroland, many teachers in European schools will stay put and schools will not contract but continue to hold off expansion plans so opportunities will be very limited.  We can expect teacher salaries to remain flat with little competition to force them up, and in many parts of western Europe tax rates will probably increase.

For those with a right to work in the UK, public sector funding will limit the amount of supply jobs. However, London is a transitory place and therefore usually a vibrant market for resilient and flexible supply teachers who can teach successfully at challenging inner-city schools.  In the rest of England, however, Agency Worker Regulations are reshaping the landscape and teachers with a lot of experience will often be disadvantaged if they try to land long term supply jobs. We are renewing our partnership with Randstad Education so any teachers with a right to work in the UK wanting to work in London or Manchester areas should contact us.”

Taken from the “Teach the World with Teachanywhere” blog written by General Manager by Diane Jacoutot.


Currently (as of 11 March, 2012), on www.internationalschoolcommunity.com, we have 194 international schools listed in this region of the world.  That’s 35 more international schools than the region of the world with the next highest number which is in East Asia.  I am not for sure what that exactly means though as there just might be more international schools in Asia than in Europe or in the Middle East.  But what it does mean is that there are what would seem to be many options for people wanting to work in Western Europe.

Out of the 22 countries we have listed in Western Europe, the top four countries with the highest number of international schools listed on International School Community are the following:
1. Germany (32)
2. Italy (22)
3. Spain (21)
4. Switzerland (15)Some more facts about these Western European international schools:
• 36 teach the American Curriculum, 61 teach the U.K. curriculum and 18 teach the IPC curriculum.
• 61 are less than 15 years old, 91 are between 16 and 50 years old and 42 are more than 51 years old.
• 48 are For-profit schools and 146 are Non-profit schools.

The following schools have had comments and information submitted on them:
There are many more!  Check out the rest of them here.Many of our members currently work at international schools in Western Europe:
Natasha Marsoner (Munich International School)
Jeff Shaw (International School of the Hague)
Alex Lianne  (École Internationale Académie de la Capitale International School)
Cory Greenberg (Copenhagen International School)
Ian Lally (John F. Kennedy School Berlin)
Josselyn van der Pol (Berlin Brandenburg International School)

There are many more! Check out the rest of them here. If you are interested in working at an international school in Western Europe that one of our members currently works at, feel free to send these members a private message with the questions and concerns you would like first-hand account answers too.

So, we will just have to wait and see then how the “International School Community” in Western Europe actually pans out for the year 2012.